AZORE® CFD Visits iFly

AZORE® CFD Visits iFly

By Logan Szajnecki

If you’re anything like myself, you are terrified of heights; yet, you have always wondered what it feels like to plummet from an airplane into the open sky (with a parachute, of course). Indoor skydiving companies like iFly bridge the gap between expensive, intimidating leaps of faith and pure free-falling fun. Developing the facilities needed to pull off this inexpensive alternative to skydiving is no small feat of engineering.

Transient Toolbox Azore Wed, 05/25/2022 - 16:19

Azore's Innovative Transient Toolbox

By Kelly Hile

Azore is a highly accurate transient solver, but it doesn’t stop there. Azore also includes data management and post-processing tools specifically designed to make transient simulations easier.

Transient Case Study: Gas Filling a Confined Space

Transient Case Study: Gas Filling a Confined Space

by Kelly Hile

To showcase Azore’s new transient feature, our CFD engineers performed an unsteady-state simulation based on a well-documented experimental test case. The results highlight Azore’s ability to predict transient flow, gas dispersion, and buoyancy-driven flow.

In the documented experiment, a test fixture (pictured below) is gradually filled with hydrogen gas at a set flow rate through a nozzle on the bottom left.

Azore’s Built-in Tools for Evaluating Mesh Quality

Azore’s Built-in Tools for Evaluating Mesh Quality

by Kelly Hile and Dr. Jeff Franklin, P.E.

In Computational Fluid Dynamics, a high quality solution begins with a high quality mesh. Azore is committed to solver integrity, and this starts at the very beginning of the CFD process with mesh quality. Azore has a number of embedded tools to evaluate a mesh and identify low quality cells, so that the solution process can proceed with stability and accuracy.

Validation Case Study: Flow Around a Cylinder

Validation Case Study: Flow Around a Cylinder

by Kelly Hile

Fluid flow around a cylinder is well-documented to have a series of vortices in its wake, depending on the velocity of the flow. This flow behavior is commonly referred to as the von Kármán vortex street or vortex shedding. The phenomena was first proven in 1911 by Theodore von Kármán and occurs on both the small and large scale, from flow around the strings of a musical instrument to atmospheric flow around buildings and islands.